The Impact of Environmental and Social Harm on Victims:

An Empirical Investigation into the Technique of Onshore Hydraulic Fracturing in the United Kingdom.

Jack Lampkin

   
Jack's thesis is currently entitled 'The Impact of Environmental and Social Harm on Victims: An Empirical Investigation into the Technique of Onshore Hydraulic Fracturing in the United Kingddom.' The literature review is split into two sections. The first section critiques a number of theories that can be applied to fracking in the UK including Green Criminology, Utilitarianism, Eco-philosophy, Environmental Victimology and Treadmill of Production theory.

The second section looks in depth at hydraulic fracturing in the UK with an analysis of relevant command and control legislation outlined in The Petroleum Act 1998, The Climate Change Act 2008 and The Infrastructure Act 2015. This section also critiques hydraulic fracturing globally in a historical context, as well as analysing the potential social and environmental victimizations that may result from fracking by assessing fracking's potential impact on: water, well integrity, seismicity, flaring, health risks and local community impacts.

Jack has recognized that fracking is an emotive and controversial issue in the UK, an issue that has divided political opinion as well as divided public opinion. As a result of this, empirical data collection for Jack's thesis involves conducting interviews with a range of different stakeholders associated with the fracking industry in an attempt to identify the most salient concerns for public and industry alike. The recent passing of Third Energy's KM8 well at Kirby Misperton in North Yorkshire by North Yorkshire County Council places Jack in a unique position to research a new form of fracking technology in the UK the expansion of which appears imminent.     
    

Photo: Loadmaster  (David R. Tribble),  CC BY-SA 3.0